Intel Curie has been discontinued.

Discussion in 'UDOO X86' started by Wilson, Jul 25, 2017.

  1. Wilson

    Wilson New Member

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    Per https://communities.intel.com/thread/116434, the Intel Curie microcontroller, which is resident on the UDOO x86 and Arduino 101, has been sunset by Intel.

    General "community support" will cease this year, the CODK has been frozen, and I expect no official engineering support from Intel from this point forward. (The poor documentation will remain poor, and the bad arduino library support will remain bad)

    Documentation will remain available until 2020. Hopefully some of the docs they've kept behind closed doors will come out to public view.
     
  2. Maurice

    Maurice Active Member

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  3. Wilson

    Wilson New Member

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    Are you really that surprised though? I can't say I am. Intel has really screwed up their entries into the "hackerspace" realm between Edison/Joule and Curie. Bad public documentation, lazy tutorials and examples that simply tell you to connect the board and "now you're ready," libraries with API documentation that says "just look at the code to figure out how it works," making you sign NDAs if you want detailed data. Oh, and let's talk about the high prices.

    The use of the Arduino framework for Curie was a great step forward, if only it worked right.

    Intel is a real piece of work.

    It's sad because I really believe the hardware is top notch. Now I'm just waiting for them to cancel RealSense. Then they will have canceled all of their products I have invested in. :confused:
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2017
  4. Maurice

    Maurice Active Member

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    @Wilson,

    I'm afraid that this might mean UDOO's X86 (or Arduino 101) will follow the Neo, where the 'promise' is that it is an Arduino, but any more advanced library fails to work, therefore making it not so usefull as a maker platform.
     
  5. jas-mx

    jas-mx Active Member

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    If I were to take a cynical view then the remaining Arduino 101 Intel stock may have been shifted by including it in the UDOO's x86 given Intel have pulled out of the wearable market. If I were even more cynical the same could apply to the Braswell cpu ;).
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2017
  6. waltervl

    waltervl UDOOer

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    Crisis in Udoo X86 team too I suppose. They have spent a lot of money in development.
     
  7. EBRAddict

    EBRAddict New Member

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    I bought the UDOO x86 for a specific purpose and that included the need for the 101 (or really any SPI-enabled Arduino compatible) as a coprocessor. This doesn't affect me at all because my intended application will work fine.

    Intel's delivery never kept pace with their marketing BS. I'm glad I didn't invest in any of their pricier boards like the Joule or Galileo. Honestly I'm not sure what their intent was, but it couldn't have been to make money.
     
  8. Wilson

    Wilson New Member

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    Yes - I'm sure UDOO X86 will shortly also be discontinued under supply pressure of the Curie. Unless "Intel is actively working with alternative manufacturers to continue to make the Arduino 101* development board available to the market." means that Intel is actively working to hand off the Curie to another company too. Seemingly unlikely though since the Quark MCUs that the Curie is based on have not been discontinued - yet - meaning Intel is far less likely to release their intellectual property for third party Curie production without the typical super strict and cost prohibitive license from Intel.

    Still - one can dream.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2017
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  9. ccs_hello

    ccs_hello UDOOer

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  10. jas-mx

    jas-mx Active Member

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    There a quite few stability/reliability issues with Arduino 101 especially with i2c and wire libraries (some defects open for months) and there is little chance of these being resolved, so keep that in mind if anyone plans to develop with it.
     
  11. Maurice

    Maurice Active Member

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    This is exactly my worry. These kind of problems made the Neo much less usable, and UDOO doesn't seem to be able to solve them, and neither give the community enough information to solve them.
     
  12. Wilson

    Wilson New Member

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    The problems @jas-mx are referencing are with Intel's Arduino libraries and their compatibility with the Curie - UDOO is not responsible for that. Unfortunately neither Ardunio nor Intel believe they are responsible to fix the general Arduino 101 problems either.

    And Intel will never provide enough information for the community to resolve the problem without a big fat NDA, guaranteed. So much for open source.

    This is why Intel will never earn any money or loyalty from the "maker" and "university" communities.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2017
  13. jas-mx

    jas-mx Active Member

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    UDOO were responsible for deciding which Arduino product to include on the x86, given that Curie never gained market transaction you would have thought that they would have done their due diligence by selecting an mcu which had better support to begin with. Furthermore it doesn't make sense to hardwire a wearable mcu to an SBC, it primary features such a battery powered, IMU and BLE aren't really exploited. Being low power the mcu conserves power by running at a low clock rate (32Mhz), for the same BOM I am sure a higher clocked MCU could have been selected. I suspect the way the deal was done for UDOO x86 meant that only Intel chips could be selected. This partly driven by that the fact Intel would want students to leave University with experience of their platform as way of recommendations of their mcu in industry.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2017
  14. Charlie Miller

    Charlie Miller New Member

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    I purchased the UDOO x86 to have a Win 10 SBC. I was not concerned about the Arduino support. However, since placing that order last December, I have become involved in a Raspberry Pi 3 project and have started to appreciate the "maker" market a little more. Perhaps UDOO should drop the Arduino support and become its own, standalone maker board by implementing a full set of GPIO pins, SPI, PWM, etc. Create a Win 10 library similar to the BCM2835 library I used on the RPi3. This configuration might tempt a lot of Windows developers, who have no interest in learning Linux, to enter the maker market. If UDOO would give me the ability to use the standard Windows developer's environment like Visual Studio with a robust set of API calls to manage the "maker" side of things, UDOO might just create a whole new market of "WinMakers." At the same time, UDOO would need to also offer a couple of "hats" for relays, stepper motor drivers, etc.

    Also, I noticed the makers of the Latte Panda, are selling a 32bit version of that borad with a licensed copy of 32bit Windows 10 pre-installed at a very good price. This may be something to consider. I have trouble understanding why dedicated maker projects need a 64 bit architecture and more than 4 gigs of memory.

    Charlie
     
  15. Maurice

    Maurice Active Member

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    What? No Linux? I haven't run Windows for years and I intend to keep it that way. Whatever should be done it should be cross platform.
     
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  16. sirrab

    sirrab UDOOer

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    I agree!
     
  17. Charlie Miller

    Charlie Miller New Member

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    Nothing in my post indicated that I did not want the board to run Linux. It can run as many OS versions as the chip set supports. I just want to be able to access a full set of GPIO pins, PWM, SPI, COM and similar directly from a Windows development environment and not need to tack on an Arduino to get those functions.

    Right now the UDOO folks are going to have to immediately buy thousands of the Intel Curie processors to have a supply to keep making the current x86 board or they will need to redesign the board. It has been suggested that UDOO has an agreement with Intel requiring their x86 board ONLY use Intel chips if they want to continue to get low prices on the Intel SOC. Unfortunately, the third option is to just drop the x86 board altogether and chalk it up to yet another Kick Starter project that failed.

    Charlie
     
  18. vpeter

    vpeter Active Member

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    One thing not to forget: Udoo X86 started development in last quarter of 2015.
     
  19. trakskills

    trakskills New Member

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    It would be nice if Andrea or Laura could say something about the further way of the udoo x86
     
  20. waltervl

    waltervl UDOOer

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