Using Udoo with Cintiq

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by SuperCrabbyBun, Mar 29, 2017.

  1. SuperCrabbyBun

    SuperCrabbyBun New Member

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    hi! I am brand new to tinkering with technology. I have never used such a device before. I was hoping to use it with a Wacom Cintiq to make my own makeshift Mobile Studio Pro/portable tablet. Would you advise it? How does this device work with Windows 10, Photoshop and adobe flash 6? I was planning on using it for 2d animation and high resolution digital illustration.
    Which version would you recommend? I was looking at this one: UDOO X86
    Any accessories you would recommend or ways to configure it to optimize it to my needs?
     
  2. Laura

    Laura UDOOer

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    The UDOO X86 uses an Intel quad core x86 processor that supports the 64-bit instruction set, so you can install the 64-bit versions of your favourite applications, like Photoshop.

    With the M.2 slot on the underside of the board, you can add high performance storage which takes up minimal physical space (see the picture on the following wiki page - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M.2).

    With regards to choosing a UDOO X86 model, I'd suggest geting the ULTRA, as it comes with 8 GB DDR3L ram.
     
  3. Andrea Rovai

    Andrea Rovai Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome in this community!
    What do you mean by high resolution digital illustration? Especially, what do you mean by "high resolution"?
    For what concerns the tablet, to replicate the tablet experience you have to look for a screen that supports USB touch and power over USB (this latest one in order to avoid the necessity of an additional power supply for the screen).
    Finally, keep us posted about your project! If I were in your shoes I'd also publish it on Hackster.io as a work-in-progress, so to gather feedback and ideas from other makers.
     
  4. SuperCrabbyBun

    SuperCrabbyBun New Member

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    Hi! Thanks for the response. What I mean by high resolution is that the files are going to be large. I just wanted to make sure the UDOO won't be laggy if I try to paint large files. I have very basic computer knowledge, I'm still learning and I'm very overwhelmed by the amount of knowledge out there on computers. I have some help (my boyfriend fixes computers for a living), and if it wasn't for him and his brother I would have no idea what a raspberry Pii is or really anything on computers.

    I just purchased a Wacom Cintiq HD, so the power cable is separate (USB power would have been so handy! But I wanted to get one that is used and discounted, plus the newer model has USB c type so I'm not sure that would work with UDOO. I opted for Wacom because I have a 10 year old screenless tablet that still functions perfectly on Windows 10, and I wanted something with good parts and software that I will be confident will last me).

    I don't mind having two power cables. I'm working on figuring out a way to wrap all the cables around in a container so when I travel they don't get tangled up (The tablet comes with an HDMI, USB and then power cable. My goal is to keep the UDOO with the USB and HDMI in the container, while only having to deal with 2 power cables on the go). I have an engineer friend who has access to a 3d printer and all kinds of building equipment, I'm hoping to work with him on building the container. Something I can hopefully mount or strap to the back of the tablet.
    Or a container that fits over the part where the cables split, so it looks like one cable that comes out of the tablet, then in the middle the cable (where it splits) is the container with the UDOO, HDMI and USB cords plugged in. Then 2 power cables coming out the other end of the container to plug in the wall.

    I'll check out the Hackster Forum. Thanks!
     
  5. gaoqiu66

    gaoqiu66 New Member

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    If you do decide to buy off brand, here are some things to watch out for:

    Resolution (Make sure it’s HD 1080 or better) .

    Pressure levels (you want at least 1024) .

    Parallax (bad parallax can make your strokes inaccurate) .

    Lag (some tablets will trail <1 second behind you while you draw) .

    Physical size (I found screens around 10-16 inches are perfect for drawing. Bigger screens are awkward and smaller can cause wrist problems) .

    Battery life

    Picture quality (spent hours trying to remedy poor color accuracy with no luck) .

    Drivers (big one is if your tablet company stops supporting them or doesn’t make drivers for your OS) .

    I've had the XP-PEN Artist 12 Pro drawing pad with screen since February and I absolutely love it.

    Wacom is the industry standard, so you pay a premium for a premium product that all the professionals use. But after reading and watching reviews of the other tablet brands, I decided to buy XP-PEN because it was my first drawing monitor purchase and it was only a little over $200. Other than its small screen, I really have nothing bad to say about it and I enjoy drawing on it.

    Wacom is expensive and they can justify their prices by having market dominance in the drawing tablet and monitor industry, but other brands have released products that work just as good for a lot less.
     

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